License # 103487817-297-3426

License # 103487

The Anchor Way Story

Anchor Way Senior Care opened for business March 2008.

As the Owner and Manager of Anchor Way Senior Care, LLC; supported by my husband Patrick, my greatest inspiration for the vision of Anchor Way Senior Care was born due to my cherished memories of Eva Moye, my great grandmother.

Granny, as we affectionately called her, was born January 25, 1892. She was one of the strongest women I knew; her grandson-n-laws later nicknamed her “Granny Grip” because of her strong handshakes. Granny stood tall though she was about 4’4” and could out work any woman I knew, during her lifetime as well as today. She lived to be 108 years old and died in January 2000

My memories of how Granny cared for me during summer vacations are unexplainable. As we drove down the long drive way (which seems to be 10 miles long) gravel was thrown up by the tires of my Dad and Mom’s gold and black Pontiac car. As we drove closer to Granny’s little gray framed two bedroom home, she would stand out on the front porch as if she heard us coming. Her little body would jump up and down repeatedly as she yelled, “come on in, come on in this house”! She seemed old to me all of my life, yet her spirit and stamina never aged. She had so much energy, it was really hard to keep up her pace.

Granny would awake early in the mornings praying and singing out to the Lord.
That alone, I realize now how she impressed me even at the age of three. She wore black combat looking boots, long dresses or skirts that touched the top of the boots with light colored long sleeved blouses and always an apron. I believe she made them by hand. She would tie her stockings at the knee and strut briskly on her way.

I remember hearing crickets early in the mornings as she prepared to walk out onto the garret (porch) of their house that sat on ten acres of farmland. I couldn’t for the life of me understand how she never really “worked”, yet they had plenty. There were fruit trees for miles, melons, and vegetables of all kinds. There were at least twenty or thirty cows and chickens that my sisters and cousin would chase—but of course we didn’t tell Granny. Among the animals were hogs, pigs and an old mule called Smokey. All the kids were afraid of him. Granny would take us to church, where we would visit cousins and my Dad’s mother, Big Mama Rosie Lee and to the old creek, miles down an old dirt road in Bull Run to let us swim.

We walked because Granny never drove. I remember jogging to keep up with her. We would swim a while, catch a few minnows in a jar then head back home.

We played outside all day until Granny called us for meals that were oh so good. She could cook anything! Everything was raised on the farm; eggs, bacon, and milk. She made homemade biscuits every morning and churned her own butter from the cow’s milk. She allowed me to help. Lunch; the menu was unpredictable; but we knew that it would be chicken, beef or pork because they raised them. Moreover, it was finger licking’ good and fresh. Our most popular treat just before bed was homemade caramel candy with pecans that she made from syrup. Some nights we would indulge in a big bowl of lemon ice cream.

Some days we were out to play late in the evening. We would get huge mosquito bites; really big sores would appear on our legs. Granny would go into the woods, chop down a green plant similar to small mustard greens and boil the plant. Granny used an old torn white rag attached to a stick to douse our legs with the plants liquids to heal the bites and removed all scars; unbelievable! To this very day, I wish I had bottled the concoction.

She had two dogs. Blue was a scary looking dog. He stayed out back, locked behind a six foot gate; he was vicious. Bobby was Granny’s little Chihuahua dog. For some reason, he didn’t like the sight of my Dad. He would bark, and circle around Granny’s skirt tail for safety until my Dad was inside or left him alone. Bobby’s bark was much larger than his bite.

I sat near the huge black pot belly stove and watched The Young and the Restless and Days of Our Lives with Granny everyday as she ironed Grandpa’s clothing. I knew not to ask any questions during her soap operas. I learned all the characters and still watch both of the shows today when I have the opportunity.

During holidays, my Uncles, Aunts and Cousins would visit at Granny’s house. One of the animals would get slaughtered and Granny was able to feed everyone a grand feast. She would pack our trunks with leftovers, fresh vegetables, fruit preserves, dried meats, fresh meats, homemade desserts and lots of hugs and kisses. Then it was time to hit the road and return home from summer vacation. These are only a few of the greatest memories of my life with Granny.
I never thought the time would come when she could no longer take care of herself. It happened. My Great Grandpa passed early on and my Dad moved Granny in with him to care for her. She would wander off, sometimes confused. Granny continued to ask to go back to what she referred to as “the home place”. My Dad finally agreed. It was there when she slipped, fell and broke her hip. Things were never the same. She was later placed in a nursing home. Angrily……….I didn’t like it but I respected my Dad’s decision and felt it was the right choice at the time; since I was young and had no means of taking care of her myself.

Now I can provide Anchor Way Senior Care as a place of safety and security for the elderly; an alternative for children of the elderly who would not choose to place their aged parent in a nursing home. I imply nothing negative regarding nursing homes. I believe Granny would have enjoyed being in a “private home”.

Granny left a legacy and I am glad to have had her in my life.

She taught me to love, to share, to give back and enhance the lives of others. In her honor I will work until I can’t, taking part in the lives of the elderly men and women of this world. I can feel her sweet spirit smiling down on me today.

My Inspiration,
Mrs. Eva Moye
January 25, 1892 – January 5, 2001
For this reason:
March 28, 2008
Anchor Way Senior Care
was officially BORN!

Contact ANCHOR WAY SENIOR CARE

If you have any questions or inquiries, feel free to visit us (by appointment only) or give us a call, whichever you feel is most convenient. We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

10805 W Cleburne Rd.

Crowley, Texas 76036

Phone : 817-297-3426

License # 103487

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